Welcome to HCV Advocate’s hepatitis blog. The intent of this blog is to keep our website audience up-to-date on information about hepatitis and to answer some of our web site and training audience questions. People are encouraged to submit questions and post comments.

For more information on how to use this blog
click here, the HCV drug pipeline click here, and for more information on HCV clinical trials click here

Be sure to check out our other blogs: The HBV Advocate Blog and Hepatitis & Tattoos.

Alan Franciscus
Editor-in-Chief
HCV Advocate
HBV Advocate

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Family History of Liver Cancer Increases Risk of Developing the Disease


70-fold Elevated Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in those with Family History and Hepatitis B or C Markers

A family history of liver cancer is reported to increase risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), independent of hepatitis according to findings published in the May issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. The study also shows 70-fold elevated risk of HCC in those with liver cancer in the family and markers for hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV). 

Liver cancer ranks sixth in incidence and the third cause of mortality worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) liver cancer was responsible for 700,000 deaths in 2008, with HBV and HCV accounting for 78% of all cases of HCC. A vaccine for HBV has been available since 1982; however prior studies have shown familial clustering of HCC in East Asia where HBV is common. While medical evidence reports family history to be related to HCC risk, little is known of this relationship in non-Asian populations. 

“There is a high incidence of liver cancer in southern Italy which is likely a result of a higher frequency of HCV in this area,” explains Professor Carlo La Vecchia from the Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche ‘‘Mario Negri” and the University of Milan in Italy. “Our study investigated the relationship between family history and liver cancer in a Western population.” 

The case-control study was carried out between January 1999 and July 2002, and included 229 cases of HCC and 431 hospital controls. HCC patients ranged in age from 43 to 84 years, providing survey information and blood samples. The control group included patients admitted to hospital for conditions not related to tumors. Analysis of data on family history and liver cancer updated to April 2011 was also performed. 

Results show that 75% of the cases and 11% of controls showed evidence of HBV and HCV infection. Family history of liver cancer was associated to HCC risk after adjusting for chronic HBV and HCV. Compared to subjects without family history of liver cancer and no chronic HBV and HCV, researchers reported an odds ratio of 73 for those with both risk factors, indicating a 70-fold increased risk of developing HCC. 

“Our findings confirm that individuals with a positive family history of liver cancer have three times higher risk of developing HCC,” notes Professor La Vecchia. “Monitoring individuals with family history, particularly those with hepatitis markers, could help to identify HCC at an earlier stage, and hence potentially reduce mortality from HCC.” 

Full Citation: Family History of Liver Cancer and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.” Federica Turati, Valeria Edefonti, Renato Talamini, Monica Ferraroni, Matteo Malvezzi, Francesca Bravi, Silvia Franceschi, Maurizio Montella, Jerry Polesel, Antonella Zucchetto, Carlo La Vecchia, Eva Negri and Adriano Decarli. Hepatology; Published Online: March 21, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/hep.24794); Print Issue Date: May 2012. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hep.24794/abstract.
Author Contact: To arrange an interview with Professor La Vecchia, please contact Sergio Vicario with the University of Milan at svicario@metafora-mi.it or at +39 02 45485059.

These studies are published in Hepatology. Media wishing to receive a PDF of the articles may contact healthnews@wiley.com.
  About the Journal
Hepatology is the premier publication in the field of liver disease, publishing original, peer-reviewed articles concerning all aspects of liver structure, function and disease. Hepatology’s current impact factor is 10.885.Each month, the distinguished Editorial Board monitors and selects only the best articles on subjects such as immunology, chronic hepatitis, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, genetic and metabolic liver diseases and their complications, liver cancer, and drug metabolism. Hepatology is published on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1527-3350.


About Wiley-Blackwell
Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world’s leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or our new online platform, Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world’s most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

No comments:

Post a Comment